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How to Use LabVIEW Control Design and Simulation Module for System Analysis and Design


How to Use LabVIEW Control Design and Simulation Module for System Analysis and Design




LabVIEW Control Design and Simulation Module is an add-on software that integrates with the LabVIEW programming environment to offer capabilities such as built-in parallelism, multicore, and multirate technologies as well as tools for deploying to real-time hardware. You can use this module to simulate dynamic systems, design controllers, and deploy control systems to real-time hardware. You can also integrate measurements with design for system identification, model calibration, or model validation.


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In this article, we will show you how to use LabVIEW Control Design and Simulation Module for system analysis and design using a second order system as an example. We will use LabVIEW MathScript RT Module to create and manipulate mathematical models of the system. We will also use the Control Design Assistant to perform linear analysis and design of the system.


Step 1: Create a Mathematical Model of the System




The first step is to create a mathematical model of the system that you want to analyze and design. You can use LabVIEW MathScript RT Module to create and manipulate mathematical models using textual math notation. LabVIEW MathScript RT Module supports a subset of the MATLABÂ scripting language syntax.


For this example, we will use a second order system with the following transfer function:


$$G(s) = \frac1s^2 + 2s + 2$$


To create this model in LabVIEW MathScript RT Module, you can use the following commands:


num = [1]; % numerator coefficients


den = [1 2 2]; % denominator coefficients


sys = tf(num, den); % create transfer function object


You can use the tf function to create a transfer function object from the numerator and denominator coefficients. You can also use other functions such as ss, zpk, or frd to create state-space, zero-pole-gain, or frequency response data models respectively.


Step 2: Perform Linear Analysis of the System




The next step is to perform linear analysis of the system using the Control Design Assistant. The Control Design Assistant is a graphical user interface that helps you perform common control design tasks such as open-loop and closed-loop analysis, stability analysis, frequency response analysis, root locus analysis, and controller synthesis.


To launch the Control Design Assistant, you can right-click on the transfer function object in the LabVIEW MathScript Window and select Launch Control Design Assistant from the shortcut menu. Alternatively, you can use the cda function in LabVIEW MathScript RT Module.


In the Control Design Assistant, you can use various tabs to perform different types of analysis. For example, you can use the Time Response tab to plot the step response, impulse response, or initial condition response of the system. You can use the Frequency Response tab to plot the Bode plot, Nyquist plot, or Nichols plot of the system. You can use the Stability tab to plot the pole-zero map or root locus of the system. You can also use the Controller Synthesis tab to design PID, lead-lag, or state feedback controllers for the system.


For this example, we will use the Frequency Response tab to plot the Bode plot of the system. The Bode plot shows how the magnitude and phase of the system output vary with frequency. You can use this plot to determine the bandwidth, gain margin, and phase margin of the system.


To plot the Bode plot of the system in the Control Design Assistant, you can select Bode Plot from the Plot Type drop-down menu on the Frequency Response tab. You can also adjust the frequency range and resolution using the Start Frequency, End Frequency, and Number of Points controls. The Bode plot will appear in the Plot window as shown below:


The Bode plot shows that the system has a bandwidth of about 1.4 rad/s, a gain margin of infinity (no crossover), and a phase margin of about 53 degrees. These values indicate that the system is stable but has a low bandwidth and a slow response 0efd9a6b88


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